Conscious Parenting, Free Cards Friday

Posted by katie berggren on

Hello! I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving.

From the time my first little boy was born, I have had ONE big burning parenting question. One question above all over questions. Throughout his young life I learned a bunch about parenting styles, health and such – but this ONE big burning question remained.

I asked other mothers, I asked my grandmother’s sister (who was about 85 at the time) and her response still lingers in me.

I read books, I google searched, I asked the doctor…. but the question remained.

About a month ago, I was on Twitter , Tweeting like a good Twit should, and I saw a post about Conscious Parenting and a free teleclass.

Being an info buff and loving free teleclasses because they always send you the recording later (I never am able to have an hour of quiet time during the day, as you also have experienced!)

The woman who sent the Tweet was Jacqueline Green of Great Parenting Practices.

The teleclass speaker was Phil Johncock.

When signing up, I was allowed to put in one question for Phil. I quickly submitted my ONE big burning question:

“How much time each day should I spend one-on-one playing with my child?”

Jacqueline sent me the free recording and would you know that MY ONE big burning question was the first question (in the first five minutes of the show, no less) that Phil answered.

His response was (in my words):

If you are conscious and aware in each moment then the amount of time that you should spend with your children will be obvious.

At first I felt a bit jipped, but then over the course of the next couple days, I realized that he was right. When I am in each moment and paying attention to my boys, listening to their words, looking into their faces to find the story, then deep in my soul I already know the answer to my ONE big burning question.

If you pay attention to their behavior and how they are feeling, you will automatically know when to spend one-on-one time with them, and how much they need.

I was thinking, this week, about Conscious Parenting, and googled to find this Conscious Parenting 101 article by Lela Davidson. It’s a good read, so I have pasted it below, it is COPYRIGHT LELA DAVIDSON, of course:

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Thanks to Oprah Winfrey, Eckhart Tolle’s, A New Earth (note from Katie – this is a fantastic book), including it’s message of the idea of conscious parenting is getting widespread media coverage. Whether or not you agree with all of Tolle’s ideas, his advice on parenting is sound.

According to Tolle, conscious parenting consists largely of simply being with your child. This article explores that idea, as well as some other aspects of this new movement in parenting.

What is Conscious Parenting?

Before you dismiss these ideas as too new-agey and fluffy for you, consider the meaning of the word conscious according to Websters:

1. perceiving, apprehending, or noticing with a degree of controlled thought or observation
2. sharing another’s knowledge or awareness of an inward state or outward fact
3. personally felt
4. capable of or marked by thought, will, design, or perception
5. self-conscious
6. having mental faculties undulled by sleep, faintness, or stupor : awake
7. done or acting with critical awareness
8. likely to notice, consider, or appraise
9. being concerned or interested
10. marked by strong feelings or notions

Synonyms: Aware, Awake

Doesn’t seem so woo-woo now does it? Let’s all be more conscious in our parenting, more aware of how we’re perceiving and appraising our children, as well as noticing our behavior and what’s behind it.

Shifting Paradigms

Proponents of conscious parenting believe we are at a crucial point in the history of our planet. Basically, the future of the human race depends on our children’s ability to be peace-makers. Whether you believe this is nothing new, simply the human condition, or you believe major destruction is imminent if we don’t take major action now – you’ll have to agree that raising peaceful little people is not a bad thing. Maybe conscious parenting is the philosophy that speaks to you and helps you be the best parent you can be. In other words, can’t hurt, might help.

Mama Comes First

Conscious parenting calls for parents to pay attention to their children and, more importantly to their own thoughts and behaviors. It’s important to understand out own needs and personal hurts in order to avoid repeating painful patterns from our past. The idea is to limit the damage we pass on to our children so that they grow into healthy and balanced people.
Especially when frustration levels are high, we tend to fall into old, familiar patterns of behavior. Conscious parenting is all about being awake and aware to what’s going on with your child now and deal with that situation or feeling.

Give Children What They Need

According to Michael Grayson Conner, child psychologist, parents need to pay particular attention to the words we use, as well as our expectations when dealing with our children. According to Conner, here is what children need:

•Children need examples and simple instructions. They need you to show them what you want and how to do it.

•Children need to practice. It is best to have simple goals with only a few steps. Tasks that are complex should be broken down into smaller takes. As a general rule, complex activities need to be practiced about 60 times before it becomes natural. •Children need supervision and guidance when they are learning new tasks. The idea is to keep students on task, correct mistakes, help when they are stuck, allow them to struggle, and to avoid discouraging failures.

•Children need lots of encouragement and praise for their initiative, creativity and effort. They need to learn that persistence in the face of failure and discouragement can lead to success.

•Children need opportunities to do things on their own while someone periodically monitors their behavior.

We practice conscious parenting when we are actively engaged in meeting these needs. When we are paying attention to what the child needs right now. Conner provides a great example of an . interaction between a child who’s been asked to clean her room and a parent who just wants it done

article by Lela Davidson

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I hope this helps put you on a track to solving your own big burning questions.

I’d love to hear your comments. It’s Free Cards Friday, so comment on this post throughout the weekend (on the Painting Motherhood Blog or on Facebook) and be in the running to WIN Free Cards! I will choose the winner on Monday.

Love & Sincerely,
Katie
Oh and by the way, my grandma’s 85-year old sister’s response to my ONE big burning question was “A snitch here, a snitch there.”

The da Vinci Arts Middle School Art Fair is Coming Up!
2508 NE Everett, Portland Oregon
Saturday, December 5: 10-6pm
Sunday, December 6: 10-4pm

I’ll be pleased to present a whole new selection of Glass Art Charms at this event – as well as new original paintings, 8×10 prints, 12×15 Limited Edition Giclees & Holiday Cards.

above images: Simplicity and Gratitude.

Related Images:

[See image gallery at www.paintingmotherhood.com]

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